Frequently asked questions

What is Land Art Flevoland?

Land Art Flevoland, founded in 2016, is a foundation that brings the monumental works of land art in Flevoland to the attention of a wide audience. We do this by organising bus tours, initiating our own activities such as the Land Art Weekend and Land Art Live, publishing a book that is distributed internationally, and collaborating with organisations and people - within Flevoland and beyond - who are sustainably involved in land art.

Who is Land Art Flevoland?

The permanent staff of Land Art Flevoland consists of Martine van Kampen (curator), Tessa Haan (project manager Land Art Weekend), Claartje Auf dem Brinke (tours), Sophia Z├╝rcher (communication), Lot Meijers (project manager Masterplan). They all work as freelancers for the foundation.
The board of the Land Art Flevoland Foundation consists of: Vincent de Boer, Demelza van der Maas and Suki de Boer. They dedicate themselves to Land Art Flevoland on a voluntary basis.

How is Land Art Flevoland financed?

Land Art Flevoland is structurally supported by the Province of Flevoland and on a project basis by funds such as the Mondriaan Fund, the VSB Fund, Fonds21 and the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds Flevoland. For the Masterplan, Land Art Flevoland received a generous contribution from the Vriendenloterij (Friends Lottery).

Where is Land Art Flevoland?

Land Art Flevoland has no visitor centre or anything like that. The foundation currently holds offices in De Voetnoot in Almere. The artworks themselves are scattered across the province and can be accessed free of charge, click here for addresses.

What does Land Art Flevoland do?

Firstly, Land Art Flevoland has a public function: we maintain the website landartflevoland.nl, inform the public through social media, flyers, posters and so on. We organise public bus tours (3 times a year), the Land Art Weekend (once a year) and customised private bus tours (company outings, etc.). We have also published a book and a magazine.

Besides our public function, we are working on strengthening the collection by establishing a partnership of the owners of the artworks: five Flevoland municipalities and three nature organisations. To this end, we drew up a Masterplan in 2019, linking the restoration of the older artworks to improved public facilities for the entire collection.

Because of our knowledge and expertise, we are now also supervising two new art projects: Reed Bank Cycles in Almere, and a yet untitled project in Zeewolde. However, these artworks are not yet part of Flevoland's collection of land art - that's something the province has to decide on eventually.

Does Land Art Flevoland own the art collection?

No, Land Art Flevoland does not own the artworks. The artworks themselves are owned and managed by various parties:

  • Het Flevo-landschap: Aardzee, Observatorium
  • Natuurmonumenten: Deltawerk //
  • Municipality of Almere: De Groene Kathedraal (located in the area of Staatsbosbeheer), Polderland Garden of Love and Fire
  • Municipality of Lelystad: Exposure
  • Municipality of Noordoostpolder: PIER+HORIZON
  • Municipality of Zeewolde: Sea Level
  • Stichting Kunstmuseum Flevoland: Engelen/Angels

What is the relationship between Land Art Flevoland and Kunstmuseum Flevoland?

Stichting Kunstmuseum Flevoland is currently working on plans for a new museum in Almere for immersive art as well as land art. This creates an opportunity for that museum to manage and promote Flevoland's collection of land art as a 'museum collection'. The artworks would thus become part of the new museum's collection. If Kunstmuseum Flevoland gets the green light, the Land Art Flevoland foundation and Kunstmuseum Flevoland foundation will eventually merge. We're not there yet. The pilot project of this museum, under the name M., and the Land Art Flevoland foundation do work together as partners until the time of merger to introduce as many people as possible to the landscape artworks.

Where can I find the annual reports of Land Art Flevoland?

Click here to see the annual reports. They are in Dutch.

How do I get in touch with Land Art Flevoland?

Send an email to communicatie@landartflevoland.nl. Land Art Flevoland does not have a visitor centre. Our office is not open to the public. The artworks themselves are of course accessible free of charge, day and night. During the Land Art Weekend (first weekend of June), a guide will be present at each work of art to tell you all about it.

Can I make film recordings at the land art?

All artworks except Deltawerk // are located in public spaces and are available free of charge, day and night. Photos and film recordings may be made here for private use (i.e. non-commercial).

Stichting Land Art Flevoland is not the owner of the artworks, and therefore cannot formally give permission for film recordings. However, you can ask us (info@landartflevoland.nl) who you should ask permission from and what the rules and restrictions are at specific locations. We ask filmmakers and photographers to not disturb other art viewers and nature.

For commercial filming (such as commercials), we would like to point out that the image rights of the artworks lie with the artists; permission will therefore have to be sought from the artists or their studios.

The artwork Deltawerk // is located on the grounds of Natuurmonumenten and in their areas permission for commercial photography and film recordings must be requested explicitly. For this, an email should be sent to flevoland@natuurmonumenten.nl in good time. In principle, this also applies to wedding photography.

The Green Cathedral (De Groene Kathedraal) in Almere is located on the grounds of Staatsbosbeheer. For commercial photography and filming, as well as for activities and events, permission must be obtained from Staatsbosbeheer by emailing almeerderhout@staatsbosbeheer.nl. This also applies to wedding photography.

At Riff, PD#18245 in Dronten, all the usual requirements for filming in public spaces have to be met, with the important addition that it is not allowed to enter the 'roof' of the artwork. It is possible to enter the stairs and the landing (the lowered part at the top of the stairs). Climbing further, i.e. beyond the barred fence, is not permitted as the 'roof' of Riff, PD#18245 is not safe for the public.

Can I take drone shots at the land art?

Many works of landscape art look amazing seen from above. Yet it is not allowed to fly with a drone in all areas, for example near some Natura 2000 areas. Unfortunately, much of the sky over Flevoland is in the airspace of Lelystad Airport. Check GoDrone and Aeret Kaartviewer for current regulations.